The General Conversation Area

Vincentdante

Stand User
Not for the businesses involved it isn't. especially small businesses and mid size ones where the UK is a market but not key. Sure, Amazon will be unaffected (though more dependency on Amazon is bad period) and yes the issue of handling surcharges will in theory be removed (though that will be replaced with higher prices as companies will have thinner margins due to paperwork and staff that were not needed in the past for one country/market). In fact it's entirely possible that the surcharges that already exist will be an expected transaction for the business and will be, of course, past onto the consumer with a profit margin attached. All that, plus, inevitably, less choice. Not to mention the other issues for UK exporters which will hurt small and mid sized companies disproportionately .

Yeah that's what I said with the surcharges, it's the logical outcome. But I'm talking from the consumer pov because I don't really care about the business portion, they will adapt.
 

Denny Fisher

Pokémon Master
Guess we'll have to deal with this upcoming change to shipping for UK consumers as signs show that companies will have to pay for VAT upfront to the UK come January 1st (and items under £15 will be no longer exempt from VAT). Seeing some stores already saying nope to this is concerning especially for non amazon (who of course already do this) companies who additional costs for a likely small market (I wonder if Right Stuf, JB Hi Fi and plenty of others will just close sales to the UK due to the costs and reduced profits). This is basically all bad, and it's all being done in attempt to save time with customs checks.
Is that actually happening though.
Didn't the UK want to have free trade deals and lower vat so they can under cut the EU?
So that £15 limit might actually go up.
 

RaeDra

Brigade Leader
Is that actually happening though.
Didn't the UK want to have free trade deals and lower vat so they can under cut the EU?
So that £15 limit might actually go up.
Of course am no expert but, trade deals eliminate tariffs (NOT IMPORT DUTY which is VAT) for businesses importing goods and services (of various kinds). It does not, in fact, eliminate import duty for a consumer ordering from outside the UK. Import policy is government set and it currently seems that is being done to avoid adding to its new lorry park queues even further following the 1st of January.
 

Rui

Karamatsu Boy
Administrator
I don't understand how the changes to personal imports will do anything other than convince overseas suppliers to blacklist UK orders. It's completely unrealistic to add that much of a workload for one country and I cannot imagine that it's worth the time/money involved for a lot of them. A lot of overseas websites still block EU visitors outright because GDPR compliance is too confusing! The transition period is going to be an absolute nightmare for end users and I'm really not looking forward to any of it; I've already got some orders lined up to come in through proxy addresses and I can tell that there will be many headaches ahead of me :/

Of course, the government want everyone buying locally in the first place so this plays into their agenda just fine.

R
 

Vincentdante

Stand User
It's psychology 101. Something changes and the brain instantly thinks of the worst case scenario which very rarely happens. That is literally how we are built so I get it. As soon as that was pointed out to me in my training nothing really phases me anymore so I don't think it will be as bad as people are fearing.

For example this new UK tarrif is literally just a replacement for one that already exists within EU law.

1603384646596.png
 

RaeDra

Brigade Leader
For example this new UK tarrif is literally just a replacement for one that already exists within EU law.

View attachment 15356
Those are business tariffs, not personal imports. Again, this applies to companies that are being asked to pay Import Duty (Which is VAT) upfront before the arrival of an order in the UK (and on ALL orders, no minimums). This includes filing paperwork to our HMRC before the order has even been sent out. To end here, this may be a big problem or smaller companies will struggle and push through it (or just blacklist the UK).
 
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Vincentdante

Stand User
Those are business tariffs, not personal imports. Again, this applies to companies that are being asked to pay Import Duty (Which is VAT) upfront before the arrival of an order in the UK (and on ALL orders, no minimums). This includes filing paperwork to our HMRC before the order has even been sent out. To end here, this may be a big problem or smaller companies will struggle and push through it (or just blacklist the UK).

Yea dude it's literally the thing you've been on about this whole time. I looked it up I see no reason to panic
 
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RaeDra

Brigade Leader
Yea dude it's literally the thing you've been on about this whole time. I looked it up I see no reason to panic
Screenshot 2020-10-22 at 19.06.50.png
Once again, it's for business tariffs like steel and those set by the WTO and only such things, NOT for import duty (VAT for personal goods).
 
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Vincentdante

Stand User
Once again, it's for business tariffs like steel and those set by the WTO and only such things, NOT for import duty (VAT for personal goods).

So this must be what you are talking about?
1603391401525.png

But it's still kind of whatever. I still much prefer for the cost to be upfront instead of invoiced. Really the biggest company affected is Fedex and their admin fee's lol, if the smaller companies do pull out I'll find somewhere else.
 

Denny Fisher

Pokémon Master
So how does this actually work.
If I purchase something at £15 from a private seller. The seller then charges me the additional costs, then pays them to the UK?
 

Rui

Karamatsu Boy
Administrator
So how does this actually work.
If I purchase something at £15 from a private seller. The seller then charges me the additional costs, then pays them to the UK?

Yeah, or they could just sell that item to someone in the US and not bother with the hassle of registering for UK VAT when it doesn't really benefit them, which is my concern. There are a lot of situations where overseas companies are supposed to register with local tax offices to ship into a country for certain types of transaction and almost nobody ever does, because no small business has the time or manpower to account for something so fiddly (and often in a foreign language) and make tiny currency payments across borders every reporting period when they could just... not. Making it mandatory and effectively the buyer's problem when we can't import things any more (or take responsibility by paying the customs charge themselves) is going to suck. For us.

R
 

Vincentdante

Stand User
I need to pick the brains of the cinema savvy among us if that's ok. As my primary hobby is gaming and PC's this isn't my strong suite. I'm saving up to get a nice 4k TV at somepoint next year so I can play the PS5 and hook my PC up for some couch gaming as well, but also to watch 4k films on. So I wanted to use this opportunity to set up a nice little inexpensive home theatre setup for myself. I understand the sound on flatscreen TV's aren't the best (but hey guess what I've been using this whole time) and I've been advised in reddit posts not to bother with a sound bar but to start up like a 3.1 channel speaker system so I can expand it later with more speakers if I wanted?

Frankly I don't know where to start nor even what such a thing might even cost so I will probably need some tips. Though I'm a little more inclined to get the soundbar honestly, I trust you guys more than reddit and wanted to ask you first.
 

RaeDra

Brigade Leader
Yeah, or they could just sell that item to someone in the US and not bother with the hassle of registering for UK VAT when it doesn't really benefit them, which is my concern. There are a lot of situations where overseas companies are supposed to register with local tax offices to ship into a country for certain types of transaction and almost nobody ever does, because no small business has the time or manpower to account for something so fiddly (and often in a foreign language) and make tiny currency payments across borders every reporting period when they could just... not. Making it mandatory and effectively the buyer's problem when we can't import things any more (or take responsibility by paying the customs charge themselves) is going to suck. For us.

R
Yep. Am curious who at least tries to carry on with this situation at first. As a collector of dumb stuff, I am curious about websites like Mondo, Sideshow and AmiAmi (which seems the most likely to be a problem) if they carry on as usual or if they stop. UK stockists stepping their game wouldn't go amiss either.
 

D1tchd1gger

Claymore
Screenshot_20201022-201451.jpg
Sounds like my figure pre-ordered from Japan could get caught in this (I assume OMP are sites like Amazon and companies on eBay). On its own it's £110, assuming shipping counts towards the £135 figure it would have to be over ¥3000 and the method I chose doesn't go that high!
Although does the fact we've actually managed to negotiate a deal mean it's different with Japan?
 

Oldmario

Adventurer
I need to pick the brains of the cinema savvy among us if that's ok. As my primary hobby is gaming and PC's this isn't my strong suite. I'm saving up to get a nice 4k TV at somepoint next year so I can play the PS5 and hook my PC up for some couch gaming as well, but also to watch 4k films on. So I wanted to use this opportunity to set up a nice little inexpensive home theatre setup for myself. I understand the sound on flatscreen TV's aren't the best (but hey guess what I've been using this whole time) and I've been advised in reddit posts not to bother with a sound bar but to start up like a 3.1 channel speaker system so I can expand it later with more speakers if I wanted?

Frankly I don't know where to start nor even what such a thing might even cost so I will probably need some tips. Though I'm a little more inclined to get the soundbar honestly, I trust you guys more than reddit and wanted to ask you first.

if you have the speakers getting a nicer sound system set up will be a hell of a lot cheaper, i currently use nearly 20 year old 5.1 speakers from an old dvd system and they seem to be fine still but i went to a locally owned AV store that had a Yamaha reciever on clearance for £150 new which i considered a good deal until i looked online and saw everywhere else was still selling them for £300-400+ which made it even better, problem is i think you'll be looking to pay a bit more because of 4k and with a PS5 and HDR/Dolby vision i think you may need to make sure the hdmi ports on the reciever or atleast 1 of them supports 2.1
 
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