Rate the last anime you watched out of 10

HWR

Shinigami
Thanks dude, it'll be interesting to hear your thoughts, and thank you for commenting regarding my review. I tried to mention pros and cons, but I don't really consider myself really good at writing up things. However, despite not wholly enjoying the anime, the experience of watching it was interesting for me, and it feels good to be getting back into the loop again, and I was actually looking forward to sharing my thoughts with you all one here. It's been good to exercise my brain a little bit ^^
There's something satisfying about writing my little summaries that I can't quite describe, also helps me keep track of my ratings.
 

~AyaMachi~

Flame Haze
There's something satisfying about writing my little summaries that I can't quite describe, also helps me keep track of my ratings.
It did feel oddly satisfying actually; I even hand-wrote some notes on paper before commiting my review on here. Writing isn't my strongpoint, and right now, I've been finding it hard to mentally commit to anything, so I thought something with 12 eps should be manageable fornow. That said if anyone can take any little thing from anything I write on here regarding reviews, then it's a bonus ^^
 

D1tchd1gger

Mad Scientist
Yeah, I've got your pass lined up and ready to go, dude. I'm saving it for the next two episodes of DARLING in the FRANXX; I've taken to watching those in pairs. (Seems appropriate somehow!)

I'll also use your pass to check out A Place Further. If it's that good, though, I might actually end up putting it on hold after a couple of episodes in expectation of a BD release.
You've got more patience than me. Takes about a year for that, that's even if we get a release here (you're a UK only guy, right?)
 

Neil.T

Mad Scientist
You can use mine too if you like, assuming someone hasn't already nabbed them (have no idea since I hadn't checked since I put them on here)
Yeah, I checked the thread since you'd kindly offered to use them but, yeah, they'd already been taken. I tried a few different ones, and they all had, actually. I'm guessing they don't last long in the public domain these days!

You've got more patience than me. Takes about a year for that, that's even if we get a release here (you're a UK only guy, right?)
Yeah, I've just never gotten into the whole importing thing. But then, I've only just gotten into streaming, so...

There's a fair bit on CR I hope to watch, so, like I say, I might put the shows that seem likely to get a physical release on the back burner. For now, anyway.

But, yeah, I'm a very patient person. I mean, I've waited longer than a year for bigger things than a pair of Blu-ray discs! 😅

Who knows, though, I might end up watching A Place Further all the way through if I get addicted!
 
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Professor Irony

Railgun
AUKN Staff
Kakegurui

Like the illegitimate love child of Prison School and Gambling Apocalypse Kaiji, this was a tremendously entertaining show that spits in the face of such concepts as 'subtlty'. I did feel it tailed off a little towards the end, as it began to feel formulaic, and it never quite hit the same highs as Kaiji at its best, but it was well paced and boosted by a great lead character in the monstrous-yet-brilliant Yumeko.

Keen for season 2.
 

Lambadelta

Combat Butler
No Game No Life Zero

10/10

I just finished watching my copy of NGNL0, and it was one of the very best films I've seen in a long time. I already feel the desire to rewatch it after just finishing it, which for me is very rare since I rarely rewatch films.

The animation was great, the soundtrack was fantastic, and the whole film in general brought me to tears.

I say the film is a must watch.
 

bakum4tsu

Pokémon Master
B: The Beginning 9/10

Ever since I saw the first i had high hope for this one and in the end my expecations were met. Loved the dark tone of the show, main characters were nice, always good to see some clever main characters. The villains were good along with the action scenes. The "puzzling solving" situations were good, last time I remember watching something similar was in Death Note.

Cant recommend this enough. Lets just hope that tease in the end will really bring us a 2nd season.
 

Professor Irony

Railgun
AUKN Staff
A Silent Voice

Even with some knowledge of the manga, this story of a deaf girl and her repentant bully still struck me with its raw emotional power and palpable sense of isolation. Its subject matter is handled with remarkable maturity, creating a world in which I was not only constantly questioning characters' sincerity, but where understanding and forgiveness are hard to come by.

It doesn't surprise me that it would be snubbed at the likes of the CR awards in favour of Your Name as it's nothing like as nakedly crowd-pleasing (frankly, I often found it hard to watch), but I think it works harder to justify its potentially mawkish drama, and I suspect its quiet rewards are far more likely to linger in the memory.
 

ayase

State Alchemist
I should be laid up with illness more often, gave me the time to marathon Devilman Crybaby.

And I liked it a lot. It's very stylish and an excellent updating of a story which perhaps these days doesn't feel quite so original (though let's not forget that the original Devilman, if not Go Nagai in general, is responsible for originating more than a few anime tropes) but man, did it feel like the pace was rushed. The story they managed to cram into ten episodes here surely deserved at least twenty - Maybe it's okay for today's ADD generation but I like my plot progression a wee bit less breakneck and my high stakes action sequences to last a mite longer than an average of about four seconds. Oh, this demon seems powerful, how will they beat it? Oh, it's already dead.

Don't get me wrong, I'm glad something like Devilman Crybaby exists in the modern world. But having watched it, I think I'll forever be slightly resentful they couldn't have shelled out a bit more to give it the extra runtime it deserved.

Also did I ever mention how much I hate that you can't take screencaps of Netflix? I want a hallucinoJenny attack gif as an avatar dammit, but I can't have one because I can't make one myself and most of what I get when I image search is porn. Not of Jenny herself (although nothing would really surprise me anymore) but by a hentai artist who apparently goes by that name. And then halfway down the page it becomes real porn and pictures of Christian Bale.
 

Professor Irony

Railgun
AUKN Staff
I should be laid up with illness more often, gave me the time to marathon Devilman Crybaby.
Could not agree more. Despite being entirely won over by the unexpected use of Team Yuasa's trademark naive art style, I really missed the long-form fight scenes from the second Devilman OVA. I can understand not wanting to rehash what's been done before, but chopping down what I thought of as real highlights in the story, to such a minimal amount of screentime was just frustrating.

And yeah, the no-screengrabby policy on Netflix bugs the hell out of me too.
 

D1tchd1gger

Mad Scientist
Oh, this demon seems powerful, how will they beat it? Oh, it's already dead.
I especially didn't like Ah ha I've got a whole army of Devilmen, let's go f*** Satan up. Flies into battle. Come on guys let's do this. Guys? GUYS!? Oh they're all dead already. And so is everyone else and the world is now desolate wasteland! The End!! All in about half an episode (it felt like at least, it's been 2 months already since I watched it)
 

qaiz

Pokémon Master
Chibi Maruko-Chan: My Favourite Song (Film, 1992)
As the years have gone on and as I have gotten older I've found myself seeking out and enjoying movies aimed at a younger audience. The stories that they tell are often simple in nature with themes and messages that are both universal and pure, easy to understand and yet deeper than many would be lead to believe. In this often cynical world it's nice to be able to retreat to a world in which the worst thing humanly possible is homework, a world where imagination runs wild, adults are weird and a tasty treat is enough to make all your troubles melt away. Chibi Maruko-Chan: My Favourite Song is an absolute joy of a film that effortlessly captures the essence of a child's imagination and presents it in a way that only animation could. Released in 1992, this is the second film in a long running series that has cemented itself as something of a national treasure, entertaining countless families all over Japan. Since this film is stand alone it needs no prior knowledge of the series in order to be enjoyed, doing a wonderful job of introducing you to its world and characters during its one and a half hour runtime. The cast of characters themselves are a bundle of fun, their designs playful and their personalities entertaining, I quickly found myself becoming attached to the cast, aided no doubt by the charismatic voice acting that helps ascend the material. It's an entertaining script, both witty and eccentric and I found myself genuinely laughing at what would come out of characters mouths, all accentuated further by the fact that the voice cast itself is all comprised of adults that somehow perfectly straddle the line between sounding way too old to be playing the parts that they are and at the same time sounding absolutely perfect. The visual/audio combination of a child with an onion head speaking with the voice of a middle-aged man is fantastic and never fails to crack me up and it's emblematic of what this film entails.
The story of My Favourite Song revolves around 9 year old Maruko and her goal to complete her homework which is to draw a picture that represents her favourite song. The plot itself is fairly simple however the hook that holds everything together is the musical numbers that create the backbone of the film and within the first five minutes we're introduced to the first of many. This two minute sequence was animated by Masaaki Yuasa and it's an absolute treat for the eyes. What's fascinating here is the fact that even-though this scene was done well before Yuasa would get the chance to pen his own series it's still remarkably emblematic of what he would be later known for. Everything is fun and dynamic, colours all bold and contrasting, the sky one moment red the other pink, clouds yellow and the grass blue. The camera is constantly moving and panning around, zooming in and out as this Rolls-Royce is speeding through the meandering countryside road, turning into a boat, ricocheting downstream before growing mechanical legs, sprouting wings and taking flight as it soars above. The whole segment is imaginative and a marvel for the eyes. Not unlike Yuasa's later works such as Ping Pong The Animation the animation here is free-form and kinetic, not one to adhere to reality objects morph and shift in unique and interesting ways that kept me on my toes and it turns what should be a mundane scene into something fun and exhilarating.
As Maruko stares at a painting she finds hanging on the wall the second musical piece begins, and it's an equally fantastical bit of animation that's backed by a favourite song of mine, Haruomi Hosono's Paraiso. The whole segment is surreal with giant humanoid cloud people swatting at Maruko as she flies on the back of a little dragon creature, the backgrounds are purposefully simple, mimicking the look of a children book, it's both imaginative and entertaining and it's all choreographed perfectly to the beat of the laid back track. As a fan of the song it was a delight to hear it pop up.
As the students complete their pictures and as they detail just what song inspired them we enter a few more music numbers, another of which is animated by Yuasa. The backgrounds here are simple and the character designs distinctive, the focal point here is the phenomenal and dynamic camera angles. The animation is perfectly in sync with the music with backgrounds changing to every clap. Like with the previous Yuasa piece it often feels like a flexing of the muscles, showing off as the camera tilts and turns seemingly with little effort in scenes that in reality couldn't have been easy to animate, if anything it displays with certainty that even then Yuasa's style had been formed at this juncture. Even though My Favourite Song is a film for children it's abundantly clear that it's a film made by adults whom have a love for the craft, the amount of love and effort that's been poured into this film is palpable.
masaaki yuasa chibi maruko-chan chibi maruko-chan: watashi no suki na uta animated background animation dancing vehicle | #18578 | sakugabooru
From a story perspective the film is pretty simple as you'd expect but endearing nonetheless. For most people here the musical segments are the reason to watch, but the characters are charming and genuinely funny. Watching this film it's easy to understand why the series has lasted so long and just why it's so beloved. An innocence exudes from each and every scene and the focus on the family dynamic creates a sense of nostalgia that makes the film relatable. Chibi Maruko-Chan: My Favourite Song is a simple and charming film that's home to some fantastic animated pieces that helps cement this film as a must see for fans of the craft and for the young at heart.
 

Professor Irony

Railgun
AUKN Staff
Blood Blockade Battlefront & Beyond

Had been putting off finishing this, as I was unsure how to feel about it possibly being the end of the franchise, but that was a fine conclusion. I liked the little callbacks to S1, although I can't say I missed having an ongoing storyline running through the season - I was entirely fine with this one being self contained eps. Would have happily taken another cour. And an invisible werewolf squad OVA.

Punch Line

It's not something I'd go running out to recommend to people, but give it what's due, this oddball fantasy was a better series than I'd ever have given it credit for. If you can look past the considerable fan-service content, it has some interesting narrative devices that it puts to good use. It gets a bit convoluted towards the end, but the only thing I feel lets it down is the characterisation - the main cast never really seem to move past broad archetypes - and it smacks of being a visual novel adaptation where you need to follow a character specific route to learn more about them, even though it wasn't. It does make me wonder if the subsequent game adaptation was planned from the start for that very reason though.
 

qaiz

Pokémon Master
Jarinko Chie (Review, Film, 1981)

For the past 50 years Isao Takahata has worked on some of the industries most critically acclaimed films as well as some of the most beloved television series to grace the medium. A co-founder of Studio Ghibli, many of his most recognized works stem from his 32 year long tenure at the prestigious studio, however the film I'm writing about today pre-dates his Studio Ghibli debut and its an overlooked gem, a magnifying glass placed upon a fractured family unit, lovingly crafted and brimming with charm it contains all the hallmarks that you'd expect of a Takahata film from his astute understanding of everyday family life to the comedy that surrounds it, a gentle and touching tale that contains all of the heart in the world.

Jarinko Chie directed by the late Isao Takahata and released back on April 11th 1981 is a film adaptation of a long running manga series. Interestingly Miyazaki was originally penned to direct the film, he however declined and so Takahata took over, it's hard to predict just how this film would have turned out with Miyazaki as director but it's safe to say that Takahata was a perfect choice for the material at hand. After the film released Takahata went on to direct the Jarinko Chie television series only a few months later and so it's safe to say that he developed an affinity for the world and its characters and it's easy to see why, after all a film about the interactions between family members is what Takahata excels at. Jarinko Chie takes place in 1960's Osaka and revolves around Chie, a ten year old girl who lives with her single father, a brute who fights and gambles all of his money away. Chie spends her days juggling both school and her job at her families diner. The film opens with Chie's father begging his old man to lend him money due to Chie's waning health, of course he's lying about her condition as a means to obtain more money in order to gamble and gamble he does, losing all of the money to the owner of a local gambling parlour. The premise may sound depressing however what makes Jarinko Chie work is its humour, make no mistake this is a comedy. In the very next scene for example Chie spots a cat meowing timidly and tosses it a skewer to eat, the cat grabs the skewer, gets up onto two legs and walks up to a trash can, leaning against it cockily as he eats, cartoon testicles in sight not unlike the Tanuki in Pom Poko, another Takahata film. Jarinko Chie is a comedy and the fantastic voice acting is the backbone that makes up the humour, a majority of the cast in fact originate from popular manzai groups from Osaka, a traditional style of Japanese stand-up comedy.

Like Takahata's other films Jarinko Chie has a beautiful aesthetic. It's not as detailed as Only Yesterday nor unconventional like The Tale of Princess Kaguya however similarly to the two aforementioned films it's both pretty and fully realized. Backgrounds are painterly and detailed, and although a vast majority of the film utilises medium and two shots we do get some nice establishing shots that set the tone and place. Since this is a film pertaining a close-knit family the camera is often close and fixated on characters. The film itself seems to be made up of around 20 chapters and although there's an overarching theme to the film Chie finds herself in various predicaments throughout the 1 hour 50 min runtime, each taking place in a different location, almost play-like in its structure. The backgrounds are homely and appealing and make for a beautiful and accurate rendition of 60's Osaka, even today you'll notice many famous landmarks adorning the backgrounds.


As the film progresses Chie comes into contact with her mother, unbeknownst to Chie's father. These scenes are lovely and showcase Takahata's masterful ability to depict complex familial relationships through simple visual storytelling. Pillow shots give scenes room to breathe, the camera often lingers as the characters fall into a deep thought, monologuing their predicament. There's many fantastic scenes in this film however there's one scene in particular that I want to delve into and its impact was profound and surprising. It's because of its surprising nature that I initially thought to refrain from spoiling this scene however I felt that it would be a disservice not to discuss it, I also felt that perhaps bringing to light this scene would convince people to earnestly give this film a shot. Whilst spending time with one another at the park both Chie and her mother go to the cinema, and here we're presented with a clip from the live action 1967 film The Son of Godzilla. The scene shown in particular is of Godzilla and his son Minilla. In this father-son moment, Godzilla lets out his atomic breath and then gestures to Minilla to do the same, however all he can muster up is a smoke ring, Chie and her mother laugh, Godzilla gestures to Minilla to have another go and as his son gears up to try again Godzilla steps on his tail and a full blown atomic breath is let forth, Godzilla then embraces his son. Minilla like Chie lacks confidence and although Godzilla's tactics for surfacing Minilla's inner hidden abilities is comedic it's still touching. It's a poignant scene, one that could've easily been animated in order to conform to the visuals of Jarinko Chie and yet Takahata decided to place a live action film inside of the animated world and the two styles juxtapose beautifully. It's this type of out of the box and unconventional film-making that placed Takahata in a league of his own.

The soundtrack scored by Masaru Hoshi is lovely, enhancing each and every scene. Like many of Takahata's other works the film isn't afraid of silence, sometimes the silence heightens the comedic scenes and other times it's used in order to intensify the emotional moments. Ambient sounds such as birds chirping or the clanging of trains creates a sense of place, bringing the world to life. Also, it bears mentioning that unconventionally all of the dialogue was recorded before the animation, clearly this has an impact on the way in which characters are animated and it makes for a real connection between the two, even-though the film is animated and character designs are exaggerated nevertheless it really does feel like a live action film. The characters are believable and I instantly became immersed in this little group of characters and their lives, invested in their journey. I absolutely adore Chie's design, from her large head and tiny doll like eyes to her massive, larger than life grin and teeth, the juxtaposition between her and her more refined and elegant mother is sweet, I got a real sense that the two were slightly envious of each other, Chie's young and yet she's a real go-getter, the glue that keeps the family together, always happy and smiling, of course as the viewer we're also privy to those moments in which she is less certain in her own abilities.


Even-though this is one of Takahata's earlier works you really get a clear sense of his abilities, even at this stage. As I mentioned earlier Jarinko Chie is broken up into chapters, little vignettes that capture everyday life within Chie's household, this structure is similar to My Neighbors the Yamadas, a later Takahata film. A soft and delicate film about everyday life, the thoughtfulness that's applied to the ways in which the characters interact with one another also reminiscent of Yamadas. The deliberate pace in which the film meanders from scene to scene evocative of Only Yesterday, and of course the anthropomorphic cat with prominent testicles, a key element of this film made a similar return in Pom Poko 13 years later. Although Takahata was known for his films that tackled serious matters, even Pom Poko, a film with an oddball cast and aesthetic is enshrouded in a serious plot about the environment. It's evident that Takahata had an understanding of comedy, utilizing it beautifully throughout his 50 year long portfolio. At the end of the day some of the funniest moments occur within otherwise unassuming households, moments between loved ones, forever living in the hearts and minds of those close to us, never to be forgotten, undoubtedly the memories we all have of Takahata and his films will too live on for eternity.
 

Professor Irony

Railgun
AUKN Staff
Garo: Vanishing Line

A solid, above average action-adventure, much enlivened by its high calibre visuals, but held back by some rather rote storytelling. For much of the duration, I was watching this at the same time as Blood Blockade Battlefront and, while Garo was certainly more consistent, I don’t think it ever felt really special, in the way that BBB does at its best.

Overlord s1

Of all the ‘trapped in an MMO’ series I’ve come across, this certainly has the most interesting spin on the concept and was always compelling in its execution, but it never really establishes a credible threat to the MC and feels like it spends the entire cour setting up something that has yet to arrive. I’m keen to start on s2, but if I didn’t have the option to do so immediately, I think I’d have felt a bit short changed.
 

Azar

Vampire Ninja
That could easily work as an Overlord season 2 review... Hopefully, season 3 will finally give us what we all want.
 

Lambadelta

Combat Butler
That could easily work as an Overlord season 2 review... Hopefully, season 3 will finally give us what we all want.
If your expecting some sort of threat to ever appear in Overlord. I'll tell you to give up now. There is nothing along those lines in the novels yet.
 

ayase

State Alchemist
Since I took the HiDive I decided to watch Made in Abyss, and I did so in one sitting. I hadn't really paid this much attention when it was big last year - Nothing about it looked particularly special, just another "young characters adventure in a fantasy setting" show which there seem to have been a few of recently and none of which have particularly taken my fancy. But I watched Made in Abyss on recommendation from a friend whose judgement I usually trust, and boy was I wrong about it not being special.

The world of Made in Abyss is not your run of the mill party adventuring D&D or Final Fantasy XI fantasy setting. Of all things, I feel like it has more in common with something like Galaxy Express 999 (and perhaps even the story that inspired that, Night on the Galactic Railroad) in that it's the story of a journey by inexperienced young protagonists through very strange and different worlds to the one they know towards a mysterious final destination. A journey in which they learn hard truths about life that erode their innocence but perhaps bring them a better understanding, a physical journey into adulthood if you like. Not to say that Made in Abyss is particularly deep or philosophical, but it's certainly quite thoughtful when it comes to its humanity and the characters' relationships. It's also a very beautiful and unique world, the environments appear like more subdued, neutral palette versions of the kind of otherworldly fantasy art of the '70s and '80s, like if you turned down the saturation on a Roger Dean painting.

And as for those main characters, they're on the cusp of their teenage years and they actually act like it, not like they're 8 or 18. They have a certain confidence and naivety that they can accomplish things by themselves which are incredibly difficult even for the adults in their world, but when things go wrong they also feel scared and helpless. They're a girl and a boy an the onset of puberty and you can believe that they are (with Reg obviously starting to feel shame and the pull of attraction to Riko, who hasn't quite got there yet and is still more of an innocent) and all of this makes them realistic kids. Kids you know really shouldn't be in these dangerous situations (and it's slightly concerning that the adults in the world they interact with don't seem to have much of a problem with them venturing into what is almost a literal Hell/underworld) but who I easily find myself rooting for and willing to succeed against the odds.

But more than anything I'm enjoying the atmosphere of mystery and feeling of trepidation at what the next thing the abyss is going to throw at Riko and Reg will be, whether physical danger or just a new revelation. It makes it feel like a real adventure the viewer is being taken on too. But viewers are also privy to knowledge that there is a real sinisterness to this world that lies just outside the understanding of the main characters (despite the darkness they encounter) and I'm definately looking forward to more of that.

The tying up kids naked as a punishment is still kinda creepy though. And I can now confirm the rabbit does not have boobs.

8.6/10
 
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