Luna’s Adventures in English

Luna

Magical Girl
Hm, I was more thinking of a saying the context of warning people to be attentive.

Like "Carefully, he's a bit frail" it for people. or "Careful, it's a rather tattered" for clothes.

"Careful, the bike's rickety" then? (Never heard of it though.)


I like that one. we in the valleys use it all the time
it's knackered mun!
What's a mun exactly? =O
If you use this in a valley, is not more of a countryside dialect?
 
"Careful, the bike's rickety" then? (Never heard of it though.)
Rickety is valid english and works in the context, but would rarely be used. This is a thesaurus entry but again I don't know anyone who would use most of those words. More than one word would be used to describe the state of the bicycle such as "its on its way out". This would refer to the fact that it would soon be unusable.
If you use this in a valley, is not more of a countryside dialect?
I wouldn't say so because it's used in lots of places/regions. It's not proper etiquette really but is very much used.
 
What's a mun exactly? =O
If you use this in a valley, is not more of a countryside dialect?
The Valleys is nickname for South Wales and mun is Welsh word and means a few things. From a quick research it used to mean Woman or Maid, but now means mate, pal or man (as the American hey man, that was a cool show). So therefore it = it's knackered man!

I found this joke article when looking up The Valleys:
29 reasons everyone hates the Valleys

EDIT: Thinking on it a bit I confused myself. It should be, I think:
mum = woman is the translation from Welsh to English
mum = pal, etc is an English dialect word from Wales
 
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The Valleys is nickname for South Wales and mun is Welsh word and means a few things. From a quick research it used to mean Woman or Maid, but now means mate, pal or man (as the American hey man, that was a cool show). So therefore it = it's knackered man
Best description for it here, though I would say it's purely dialect and doesnt mean anything.
Have I already said what buggered means?
If I haven't it's like got 1000 uses, from another word for knackered to replacing some strong language. Just don't ask the English or Americans for what it's really meant to be slang for, it's an entirely different word to them
 

Luna

Magical Girl
Hui, it's been a while. But I've got two new ones~

The first:
Imagine there is a lecture or something you are not supposed to talk. Somebody's now listening and the person uses their elbow to poke at that person to pull attaction to them. How's that gesture called? Just ellbow poking?

The other one:
Imagine you have very dry skin. (Or some fungi disease on it.) So dry it's hardening up and then it rips open and you have quite a rip/tore. Kind of shapped like the rifts after an earthquake. What's that called, when you get those not-necessarily-bleeding-wounds on your dry skin?
 

IncendiaryLemon

Captain Karen
AUKN Staff
Hui, it's been a while. But I've got two new ones~

The first:
Imagine there is a lecture or something you are not supposed to talk. Somebody's now listening and the person uses their elbow to poke at that person to pull attaction to them. How's that gesture called? Just ellbow poking?

The other one:
Imagine you have very dry skin. (Or some fungi disease on it.) So dry it's hardening up and then it rips open and you have quite a rip/tore. Kind of shapped like the rifts after an earthquake. What's that called, when you get those not-necessarily-bleeding-wounds on your dry skin?
That first one would just be called elbowing.
 
Aaah, I see. I always thought the metal ones were skewers as well.

Interesting double meaning of the word though. Spit to me was always just a diffrent the ones in context of saliva and in "the spitting image of".
 
I got a new one!


(Behold my brilliant drawing skills... OTL)
So you have a thread and you make this shape with it. (With a knot or not.) What would you call the the round part of it?

Also is there a diffrence between the above and this:

?

I know there is noose, but that's when one of the two ends is cut off and if it's a rope and if the circle part is big it's a lasso. But they kind of sound deadly and also one end is cut off, so not the shape I'm thinking of.
 
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I agree with Gemsy that it'd be called a loop. The general shape would apply to anything that curves and comes back again (like a road or whatever). The one below "loops around" and comes back again so is also a loop.
 
I always thought of loops like shaped in the 8. Something you can't escape from. So a loop is a loop as long you can go back to where you start even if there is a way out?

So a bridge like this:
http://in1.bilderbuch-koeln.de/bilder/köln_deutz_rundbrücke_zur_zoobrücke_graffiti_bruecke_architektur_cde1440552_600x450xcr.jpeg

and this:
China: Haus steht mitten auf der Straße

and this:
Autobahn & Shanghai - Fotografie Steffen Schnur | Huangpu Fluss

would also be loops?
have you heard of a spiral staircase? it "loops" downwards - a spiral. It escapes me what the bridges are actually called but loops go back in on themselves, like you thought of 8, those are more like spirals as there is somewhere to go
 
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