Luna’s Adventures in English

Luna

Vampire Ninja
#1


How do you call this best in English? Like you have an assembly of keys, your house key, your basement cellar key, your bicycle key, etc. chained together with these keyrings. Key ring with keys? Bunch of keys? Batch of keys? Key bundle?
Like, you have this bundle somewhere in your room, misplaces and you want to exclaim "I can't find my key ___, have you seen it?" Or do you just say "I can't find my keys"? Would plural always suggest they are already bundled together?

In extention to that question:

How is this thing called? Key ribbon? Just keychain? How it called if the bundle is attached to this? Key bundle on a band...?
 
#2
Generally I’d go with just keys, plural would suggest they’re together. Failing keys I might use bunch of keys, would say it generally depends on how many keys are together really, if it looks fairly bulky I’d probably go with bunch of keys, if it isn’t I’d just go with keys.

In regards to the other one, I know some that would still just refer to it as “keys” but personally speaking I’d say “keychain”.
 
#3
To me a collection of keys joined together like that would be a bunch and if you lost it I would say "I've lost my keys" because there is more than one of them. I guess if you want one particular key in the bunch you might say "I looking for my house key, it's bunched with the rest of my keys"

The picture is of a Lanyard - Wikipedia. To me a chain is made of interlinking metal pieces like a bike chain or chain mail or just a plain old chain:


I guess "have you seen my key lanyard?" is a bit of a mouthful, so I would still say "have you seen my keys?" You could extend it by adding "They are attached to a lanyard"
 
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Luna

Vampire Ninja
#4
Aye, thanks for the words~

Another question:

That thing in the top. That is a bit like a small carabiner. What's that called? Key holder? Key clip? Carabiner?
 
#5
Maybe the English are just a bit simple I don't know, but I am so that's at least one of us. Keys for me as well.

"S**t where's my keys?"
"Oh bo***cks I've lost my keys!!!"
"Have you seen my keys? There's a load of them on a keyring."

Digger's right with the lanyard. The keyring would just be a keyring to me and the thing on top would be part of it (again quite simple).
Also, I'm from Manchester so I wouldn't hope to learn better English from me ;)
 

Luna

Vampire Ninja
#6
Thanks for another opinion. It raised a diffrent question through, I probably should not be asking. But what swearing is itself hiding behind the "bo***cks"? I've never seem a beeped word like this before.
 
#7
Thanks for another opinion. It raised a diffrent question through, I probably should not be asking. But what swearing is itself hiding behind the "bo***cks"? I've never seem a beeped word like this before.
THat would be bollocks. Used to describes testicles or as an exclamation of annoyance to something absurd. For instance “that’s utter bo***cks”.
 

Luna

Vampire Ninja
#9
What's the most common English expression for this?



The room is ____ in blue light.
Doused? Submerged? Soaked? Bathed? Suffused? Basked?

With soak I have more associations with fluids. Subermerge seems to me more like when a tsunami sort of disaster comes. And bask I have more seen in companion with sunlight. My best guess id doused, but I can't really remember it being used like that either.
 
#10
What's the most common English expression for this?



The room is ____ in blue light.
Doused? Submerged? Soaked? Bathed? Suffused? Basked?

With soak I have more associations with fluids. Subermerge seems to me more like when a tsunami sort of disaster comes. And bask I have more seen in companion with sunlight. My best guess id doused, but I can't really remember it being used like that either.
Bathed is the most appropriate of the options you have supplied
 
#13
The room is ____ in blue light.
Doused? Submerged? Soaked? Bathed? Suffused? Basked?
I would go with bathed.

The most common sayings I can think of for the others would be:
Doused in petrol.
Submerged under water.
I'm Soaked through. (after getting very wet)
I Basked in the sun.

I had to look Suffused up. To spread through or over and the example was "her cheeks Suffused with colour"
 

Luna

Vampire Ninja
#16
Yet another question.

What this particular, usually iconic spot in a bar called?


From what I think is the case it's just called bar. But the whole establishment is also called bar. Is there any way to differentiate?
 
#17
The table bit where the drinks are served is a bar. Stools next to it are bar stools. You could have both in a pub or even your house though.
Also your English is probably better than mine (Manchester) but yeah. Merry Christmas peeps.
 

Luna

Vampire Ninja
#18
So does that basically mean, there is no real way to differentiate between the table spot and the establishment just by a word and is in need of a context? (Pubs appear to be yet another sort of establishment, which also includes meals as focus as opposed to mainly drinks in bars.)

Also your English is probably better than mine (Manchester) but yeah.
.... This is going to be probably a so very dumb question....
But I kind of fail to comprehend this. Either this is sarcasm (indicating I'm getting annoying? ?_?) Or is Manchester in any way famous for having a sort of special English, which deviates from Standard English? Google doesn't really seem to indicate the latter, if that be the case nonetheless, is this some sort of insider?

@___@"
 
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