Luna’s Adventures in English

Luna

Stand User
When I realized that this idea was the utterly remotest thing my mind could ever have conceived, I got a speechless, blank half minute.

After that an exclamation of 嘘おっしゃい! appeared in my head.

... Language jumps ftw. ORZ

(I'm not even so very sure I got the comma right the first phrase, honestly.)
 

D1tchd1gger

Railgun
The picture is of a bar, this is where drinks are served no matter the type of establishment. There are many establishments that have bars, the one in the picture looks posh so might be a wine bar or a lounge, then there are clubs where music is the main focus or like Adam says Pubs. As far as I recall most places to go drinking on the continent are just called bars, certainly the pub is a very British thing.

@Adam-M As a Southerner I don't find Mancunian that bad, Scouse on the other hand ;) (only joking Liverpudlians :p)
 

Luna

Stand User
I wasn't aware that pubs were a exclusively British thing. oo
The fact that I totally don't hold liquor and have been thus avoiding such establishments all my life really seems to hurt my vocabulary. @_@

So is it safer to refer these establishments clubs (or pubs) rather than bars?

I never heard of Scouse before. I checked out some youtube videos.
(138) Scouse Finding Nemo (By John-Paul) - YouTube
Aside from that I barely understand a word.... This totally sounded like Dutch to me on first hearing. oo"

Macunian was also a completely new word, I guess this is what I was missing when researching yesterday.
(138) British Accents: MANCHESTER / MANCUNIAN - YouTube
I would have understood half of that specific vocabulary. What's moreI wasn't even aware that was just an accent. Thought it merely to be colloquial English. (Like dead-very, sound-decent and buzzin'-exiting or the pronouciation of shut and last.)
 

Luna

Stand User
Nice suggestion. Just looked it up, too.
(140) Best of the geordie accents - YouTube
Ok, it all sounds pretty much the same to me. (Aside that sometimes vocabulary shows up that I don't know.) I am totally missing, where they are supposed to switch between standard and non standard.
Can somebody give me a better pair of ears?
 

Luna

Stand User
I've heard Irish before on a TED Talk. Scottish I came to know from Star Trek, lol. Although I know it's just acted. And although, when I first heard it, I had thought Scotty and Checkov sounded just the same and asked myself "Hey why this Russian having the same name of a famous Canedian writer of all things and gets called a Scott if all things all the time?"

Wasn't away that Irish and Northern Irish were all that diffrent though.

... A damn. I need to get around the world more. Any good props against heavy motion sickness that transforms you into a most unpleasant sardonic sourpuss and getting people to suffer through talking to you in that state all the while you have about the worst untrained voice and weird accent possible yourself?

Oh which reminds me. Is there any accent where you don't have the pronounce the damn th (as in think and three) properly? For the love of life I can't seem to get that damn sound of "somewhere between T und F" right. And it's a real killer, when you always have to think about ways to avoid the expression of "I think".
 

Adam-M

Thousand Master
Manchester's a bit of a funny one though. Drive 10 minutes in any direction and you'll hit a different accent. I'm more Salford than anything.
I must say you tickle me Luna :)

Edit:
For the love of life I can't seem to get that damn sound of "somewhere between T und F" right.
Stick your tongue out, bite it and the blow ;)
 

Luna

Stand User
Manchester's a bit of a funny one though. Drive 10 minutes in any direction and you'll hit a different accent. I'm more Salford than anything.
I daresay that's probably the case with all big towns. I went to London last year in hopes to get myself exposed to some "proper" English. (And do some Anime online shopping, because shops wouldn send to Germany.) I ended up in complete failure, as I wound up suffering through the effects of sickness half the time and the other half there were just so many tourists and migrants around with oh so many diffrent sorts of half broken English. @_@

I must say you tickle me Luna :)[/QUOTE]
Is this another special Mancunian vocabulary or is just saying, I'm as funny as a feather tickling you to cause you laughing? ?_?
 

Luna

Stand User
"pisstake", yet another word to learn. It wasn't even on dictionary.com. But interestingly wiktionary seems to list New Zealand before Britain for the slang.

....

Lord of the Rings was made in New Zealand, wasn't it? Is that New Zealand English incidentially?
 

bailey1985

Vampire Ninja
(140) WIKITONGUES: Elizabeth speaking Cornish - YouTube
Oh my. Is there anything to be understood from this? @_@
This totally sounds uncanny to me. It has a very clear BE "tinge" overlay, but is an array of ununderstandable gibberish to me.
Sounds very gibberish to me as well, I've lived in Cornwall from the age 2, but I've never actually met anybody that speaks Cornish.
Whenever I think about the Cornish accent this video comes to mind.

 
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Luna

Stand User
Sounds very gibberish to me as well, I've lived in Cornwall from the age 2, but I've never actually met anybody that speaks Cornish.
Whenever I think about the Cornish accent this video comes to mind.

I somehow have quite some trouble to difference that to SBE. This sounds less like an accent to me than that those people just kind of sound... monotonously disengaged. @___@°
 

Luna

Stand User
Got another question.

You have Person A and Person B. Person B is, say, very passionate about a certain subject. Person A knows about this and gives Person B some hints as to indulge in his passion, fully knowing, they won't amount to anything. Person B goes and does stuff, fidgeting around, worrying unecessarily and making a fool out of himself. Person A is very much amused about it. Eventually the lie is revealed. And Person B confronts A about just why the heck he did this.
He would reply: Sorry, but it was just too much fun ____ you.
What's best to say for _____?
What A is doing is playing with B, poking fun at him, but this way of saying is clearly very negative. As is "pulling his leg". For that statement it ought to be something that kind of downplays A's bad deeds against B. (As he is in a state of self defence.) There is "teasing", but as far as I know that verb implies that B would have knowledge what A is trying to do, which he didn't because he was under the false belief, that A was helping him. "put someone on" looks just like the thing going by dictionary definition. But I think I have never heard of an "It was just too much fun putting you on."
Or is "It was just too much fun taking you for a ride." a thing to say?
 
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Adam-M

Thousand Master
Person A might be "messing" with person B. I'd have said he was being a nob though. Again, not the best person to learn from.
 

Luna

Stand User
Hm. Can you say messing around with somebody, when you purpose is to downplay what you've done? On second thought, hm. I think I know messing around of out of the context of being childish and lack of maturity. (<--- That feeling off the mark?) Might fit nicely indeed.
 

Peachy

Bumpkin
AUKN Staff
Sounds very gibberish to me as well, I've lived in Cornwall from the age 2, but I've never actually met anybody that speaks Cornish.
Whenever I think about the Cornish accent this video comes to mind.

Oo, Hello fellow farmer! That video was wonderfully accurate.

I somehow have quite some trouble to difference that to SBE. This sounds less like an accent to me than that those people just kind of sound... monotonously disengaged. @___@°
Hahaha, we do! My Grandad was proper Cornish, sometimes it became somewhat difficult to make out so I get someone who hasn't lived in this area struggling to understand (I'm the same with North England accents)
 
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