Rate the Last Film You Watched

Professor Irony

CYBER FUNKER
Moderator
Dr. Strangelove (Or how I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb) (1964)

The first time I saw Stanley Kubrick’s famous Cold War satire, I found it too genuinely alarming to really laugh at it (I think I was also just too young to get it), but coming back to it with more knowledge about the political situation of the early 1960s, and how the film plays out, really allowed me get a lot more out of it. Its humour is pitch black, but it’s a very, very funny film, with endlessly quotable dialogue and a cast of characters like political cartoons brought to life, all scrabbling towards a nuclear Armageddon brought on more by incompetence and misadventure than any real desire for world war three. Stellar though the acting is all round, the film would not be half as memorable without the astonishing trio of performances from Peter Sellers, who inhabits the starchy RAF officer, the President of the United States and the titular nazi entirely trustworthy scientist, to such chameleon-like effect that it’s almost hard to believe all three are the same person.
 

jake scully

Completely Average High School Student
31 Days of Halloween!

Day XXI: Dario Argento’s Opera (1987, Dario Argento)
View attachment 15346

This Italian Giallo film from acclaimed director Dario Argento sees a performance of Giuseppe Verdi’s Macbeth, infamous for causing bad luck with its actors, become the stalking grounds for a killer with unhinged desires. There’s some really gruesome imagery here, especially the use of sellotape and needles - as featured on the poster art.

Cult Films did a solid job with the Blu Ray and this is another recommended entry from Argento’s filmography. 4/5
Still haven’t bought this yet
In The Darkside mag it gives it a good review but nothing is said about the English track which i read elsewhere has an echo like sound and ruins the film
It states listening to Italian track with subtitles is the best
Shame I couldn’t get to buy the US blu ray on Scorpion Releasing label
 

Professor Irony

CYBER FUNKER
Moderator
Fritz the Cat (1972)

A faintly notorious slice of adult animation, I didn't find the relentlessly horny misadventures of the titular feline particularly funny, but this film absolutely does catch something of a particular moment in time that might otherwise be overly filtered or sanitised.

Fritz is an aimless young college boy caught up in the sweeping social changes of 1960s New York, but his seedy quest to cop off at every opportunity is frequently interrupted by brushes with the law, heroic consumption of drugs, and half-assed attempts to align himself with people seeking a revolution. Which revolution? Any of them, just as long it makes him a somebody.

It's unlikely to be as genuinely shocking as it must have been at the time, but the crude, bathroom door level humour does give way to a certain sense of honesty. Much as it's seen through a haze of pot smoke, for better and worse, this feels like someone's lived experience of the period, right down to the cringeworthy racial caricatures (remember the crows in Dumbo?) and casual mysogyny. I think it does fall a little short of really saying anything about this though.

Split into three broad segements, Fritz's eye-opening trip to Harlem in the middle of the film hovers on the brink of being genuinely affecting (stereotypes notwithstanding), but feels undermined by his subsequent escape into a final episode dealing with a faintly Manson-esque gang of militants, whose nasty activities seem to be of oddly little consequence.

At barely 80 minutes, you could hardly say Fritz outstays its welcome, but I also find it hard to know who I would really recommend this film to exactly. Its rawness is appealing in its way, but I think it lacks the depth that would make it attractive as much more than a weird historical artefact.
 

Professor Irony

CYBER FUNKER
Moderator
Alphaville (1965)

Cinema studies textbook darling Jean-Luc Godard's dystopian sci-fi noir is one of the more accessible films from his great fertile period, playfully dropping vintage pulp novel hero Lemmy Caution into a weird modernist hellscape controlled by a raspy-voiced AI, but anyone unfamiliar with his particular brand of filmmaking may find the uneasy combination of philosophical musing and paperback thrills a little trying.

I remember it as something I loved the first time, but couldn't be bothered with when I tried to revisit it. Going through it a third time, I liked it well enough, even though all the other people I watched it with kinda hated it, which I think is understandable. It's a great looking film that arguably predicts cyberpunk as a genre, but with much of the dialogue being improvised over an uninvolving story framework, it only really comes together intermittently and the conclusion is ultimately a bit corny. Still worth seeing just for the cinematography though; rarely have the bright lights of '60s Paris looked so alien and imposing as they do in the harsh monochrome of this film.
 

RadFemHedonist

Great Teacher
Fritz the Cat (1972)

A faintly notorious slice of adult animation, I didn't find the relentlessly horny misadventures of the titular feline particularly funny, but this film absolutely does catch something of a particular moment in time that might otherwise be overly filtered or sanitised.

Fritz is an aimless young college boy caught up in the sweeping social changes of 1960s New York, but his seedy quest to cop off at every opportunity is frequently interrupted by brushes with the law, heroic consumption of drugs, and half-assed attempts to align himself with people seeking a revolution. Which revolution? Any of them, just as long it makes him a somebody.

It's unlikely to be as genuinely shocking as it must have been at the time, but the crude, bathroom door level humour does give way to a certain sense of honesty. Much as it's seen through a haze of pot smoke, for better and worse, this feels like someone's lived experience of the period, right down to the cringeworthy racial caricatures (remember the crows in Dumbo?) and casual mysogyny. I think it does fall a little short of really saying anything about this though.

Split into three broad segements, Fritz's eye-opening trip to Harlem in the middle of the film hovers on the brink of being genuinely affecting (stereotypes notwithstanding), but feels undermined by his subsequent escape into a final episode dealing with a faintly Manson-esque gang of militants, whose nasty activities seem to be of oddly little consequence.

At barely 80 minutes, you could hardly say Fritz outstays its welcome, but I also find it hard to know who I would really recommend this film to exactly. Its rawness is appealing in its way, but I think it lacks the depth that would make it attractive as much more than a weird historical artefact.

I've seen it as well, my reason for watching it was because it's a noteworthy animated film, and I thought it was decent enough to be worth watching once, but agree with a lot of your criticisms, Ralph Bakshi is an interesting animator but his films tend to be lacking something or another, thought I've not seen many of them. Have you seen American Pop? I quite liked that one.
 

Professor Irony

CYBER FUNKER
Moderator
I've seen it as well, my reason for watching it was because it's a noteworthy animated film, and I thought it was decent enough to be worth watching once, but agree with a lot of your criticisms, Ralph Bakshi is an interesting animator but his films tend to be lacking something or another, thought I've not seen many of them. Have you seen American Pop? I quite liked that one.

Ah, I know the one you mean, but I've not actually seen it - all I really know about it is that they based the look of one character on Grace Slick from Jefferson Airplane. I'll certainly look out for it, but Bakshi's films don't seem to come up on VOD very often. The only other one I've seen was Fire and Ice, which was interesting for the heavy use of rotoscoping, but it was kind of forgettable otherwise.
 

Dai

Great Teacher
Ah, I know the one you mean, but I've not actually seen it - all I really know about it is that they based the look of one character on Grace Slick from Jefferson Airplane. I'll certainly look out for it, but Bakshi's films don't seem to come up on VOD very often. The only other one I've seen was Fire and Ice, which was interesting for the heavy use of rotoscoping, but it was kind of forgettable otherwise.
Bakshi's movies tend to be more interesting to look at than they are to watch. Fire and Ice feels a lot longer than it is, on account of how little happens. I'd convinced myself that the masked barbarian who randomly shows up halfway was the villain's father, but was surprised on a re-watch to find no mention of it. I'd ended up unconsciously inventing plot points to fill in the paper-thin story.
 

jake scully

Completely Average High School Student
The Squeeze - an underrated British gangster film from 1977
The Fury - saw DePalmas horror again and though nowhere as good as Carrie it has its moments
Gold - 1974 film with Roger Moore and its a classic with greedy business men wanting to flood the mine in order to raise the money values of gold
A Million Ways To Die - Seth MacFarlane is hilarious as the
sheep farmer against the nasty Liam Neeson - a very funny extended version on blu ray - ever get tired of seeing my favourites
 

zrdb

School Idol
The Secret Garden-I bought this on a whim yesterday and watched it last night. Not bad-one could do much worse for a family friendly movie.
 
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RadFemHedonist

Great Teacher
The Secret Garden-I bought this on a whim yesterday and watched it last night. Not bad-one could do much worse for a family friendly movie

Which one? There's at least three versions I think XP the one I've seen is from 1993 directed by Agnieszka Holland The Secret Garden (1993) - IMDb I think that's a very good version. I was curious about the new version and the trailer at least made it look like they'd added some racial diversity in casting which I think is good, but I dunno how good a film it actually is, looks like audience and critical reception was fairly middling. I think there's an older version that was on TV or in cinemas years before the 1993 one as well.
 

jake scully

Completely Average High School Student
The Devils Advocate - liked everything about this horror even the twist
Night Moves - Gene Hackman is in excellent form as usual
Cross Of Iron - Sam Peckinpahs brilliant anti war film
Delirium- Lamberts Bavas 80’s giallo - although I really enjoyed it especially with the sexy Sabrina - Dario Argento was to have directed this and would of definitely made it more better with the violence etc
 

zrdb

School Idol
Gone With The Wind-it might be a classic movie but it's so full of racism, misogyny and other nasty stuff I found it very difficult to enjoy.
 
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