Rate the Last Film You Watched

NormanicGrav

Yume no Shima Shinen Kōen
AUKN Staff
Asian Cinema Watch Day 29!


The Third Murder (Sandome no Satsujin [三度目の殺人]) is a 2017 Japanese film directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda. Before picking this film up I read from many folks across various forums that this is one of his weaker titles. I actually quite enjoyed this film and especially its premise. The story has some pacing issues but it's the final act that makes you question the whole truth of the matter. Granted a lot of what the murderer says is basically up to interpretation so the ending is rather ambiguous to that extent, but I kinda like that angle (that's how I see the film that is). It's a pretty solid film overall and the story does require some focus since every bit of dialogue is important context-wise, but I would say it's worth a watch.

The Third Murder is available to own on Blu-ray from distributor Arrow Academy.

4/5

Here's a brief look at what films I'll try and check out throughout this month:
Watched:
#01 - Japan - Yōjirō Takita's Departures
#02 - Japan - Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Before We Vanish
#03 - Japan - Toshiaki Toyoda's Blue Spring
#04 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance
#05 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Terra Formars
#06 - Japan - Hideo Nakata's Dark Water
#07 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive
#08 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive 2: Birds
#09 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive: Final
#10 - Japan - Takashi Miike's The Happiness of the Katakuris
#11 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Thirst
#12 - Japan - Kinji Fukasaku's Street Mobster
#13 - Japan - Kazuhiko Yamaguchi's Wolf Guy: Enraged Lycanthrope
#14 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Shinjuku Triad Society: China Mafia War
#15 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Rainy Dog
#16 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Ley Lines
#17 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Lady Vengeance
#18 - Japan - Akira Kurosawa's Dreams
#19 - Korea - Hong Sang-soo's Woman is the Future of Man
#20 - Korea - Hong Sang-soo's Tale of Cinema
#21 - Japan - Sion Sono's Love Exposure
#22 - Japan - Teruo Ishii's Orgies of Edo
#23 - Japan - Teruo Ishii's Yakuza Law
#24 - Japan - Yasuharu Hasebe's Retaliation
#25 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part I: No Greater Love
#26 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part II: Road to Eternity
#27 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part III: A Soldier's Prayer
#28 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's After the Storm
#29 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's The Third Murder

To Watch:
  • Shoplifters
 

farzam1999

Straw Hat Pirate
Asian Cinema Watch Day 29!


The Third Murder (Sandome no Satsujin [三度目の殺人]) is a 2017 Japanese film directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda. Before picking this film up I read from many folks across various forums that this is one of his weaker titles. I actually quite enjoyed this film and especially its premise. The story has some pacing issues but it's the final act that makes you question the whole truth of the matter. Granted a lot of what the murderer says is basically up to interpretation so the ending is rather ambiguous to that extent, but I kinda like that angle (that's how I see the film that is). It's a pretty solid film overall and the story does require some focus since every bit of dialogue is important context-wise, but I would say it's worth a watch.

The Third Murder is available to own on Blu-ray from distributor Arrow Academy.

4/5

Here's a brief look at what films I'll try and check out throughout this month:
Watched:
#01 - Japan - Yōjirō Takita's Departures
#02 - Japan - Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Before We Vanish
#03 - Japan - Toshiaki Toyoda's Blue Spring
#04 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance
#05 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Terra Formars
#06 - Japan - Hideo Nakata's Dark Water
#07 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive
#08 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive 2: Birds
#09 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive: Final
#10 - Japan - Takashi Miike's The Happiness of the Katakuris
#11 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Thirst
#12 - Japan - Kinji Fukasaku's Street Mobster
#13 - Japan - Kazuhiko Yamaguchi's Wolf Guy: Enraged Lycanthrope
#14 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Shinjuku Triad Society: China Mafia War
#15 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Rainy Dog
#16 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Ley Lines
#17 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Lady Vengeance
#18 - Japan - Akira Kurosawa's Dreams
#19 - Korea - Hong Sang-soo's Woman is the Future of Man
#20 - Korea - Hong Sang-soo's Tale of Cinema
#21 - Japan - Sion Sono's Love Exposure
#22 - Japan - Teruo Ishii's Orgies of Edo
#23 - Japan - Teruo Ishii's Yakuza Law
#24 - Japan - Yasuharu Hasebe's Retaliation
#25 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part I: No Greater Love
#26 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part II: Road to Eternity
#27 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part III: A Soldier's Prayer
#28 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's After the Storm
#29 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's The Third Murder

To Watch:
  • Shoplifters
Was actually quite interested in your thoughts on this one. Haven't seen it myself, but would very much like to do so. Is there any titles you could compare it to?
 

NormanicGrav

Yume no Shima Shinen Kōen
AUKN Staff
Was actually quite interested in your thoughts on this one. Haven't seen it myself, but would very much like to do so. Is there any titles you could compare it to?
I actually can't think of any other film to compare it towards, because it's a lawyer film (the main character is a lawyer trying to defend the murderer) and I haven't watched anything else that used that concept before. I picked the film up as part of Arrow Academy's BOGOF sale so I got my money's worth.
 

NormanicGrav

Yume no Shima Shinen Kōen
AUKN Staff
Asian Cinema Watch Day 30!


Shoplifters (Manbiki Kazoku [万引き家族]) is a 2018 Japanese film directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda. A slice-of-life film about a family that shoplifts and eventually shoplifts a young girl (well kidnapping). This film is really good and it's more about the characters than the story so the pacing is quite slow throughout. You get to see what each family member does and how they interact with each other and they are all interesting to watch especially the father of the group. The story eventually does crop up during its second half but it ends on a rather solid note (it's not exactly a happy ending though). Overall a really good film and worth a watch, I can see how this won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Shoplifters is available to own on Blu-ray from distributor Thunderbird Releasing.

4.5/5

And thus today concludes the Asian Cinema daily backlog watch. I know a lot of you are disappointed by the lack of Chinese/Hong Kong/Taiwan films but as I mentioned before I didn't have any on Blu-ray in the backlog on me. They'll be included in Phase 2 trust me.
Watched:


#01 - Japan - Yōjirō Takita's Departures
#02 - Japan - Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Before We Vanish
#03 - Japan - Toshiaki Toyoda's Blue Spring
#04 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance
#05 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Terra Formars
#06 - Japan - Hideo Nakata's Dark Water
#07 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive
#08 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive 2: Birds
#09 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Dead or Alive: Final
#10 - Japan - Takashi Miike's The Happiness of the Katakuris
#11 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Thirst
#12 - Japan - Kinji Fukasaku's Street Mobster
#13 - Japan - Kazuhiko Yamaguchi's Wolf Guy: Enraged Lycanthrope
#14 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Shinjuku Triad Society: China Mafia War
#15 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Rainy Dog


#16 - Japan - Takashi Miike's Ley Lines
#17 - Korea - Park Chan-wook's Lady Vengeance
#18 - Japan - Akira Kurosawa's Dreams
#19 - Korea - Hong Sang-soo's Woman is the Future of Man
#20 - Korea - Hong Sang-soo's Tale of Cinema
#21 - Japan - Sion Sono's Love Exposure
#22 - Japan - Teruo Ishii's Orgies of Edo
#23 - Japan - Teruo Ishii's Yakuza Law
#24 - Japan - Yasuharu Hasebe's Retaliation
#25 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part I: No Greater Love
#26 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part II: Road to Eternity
#27 - Japan - Masaki Kobayashi's The Human Condition Part III: A Soldier's Prayer
#28 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's After the Storm
#29 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's The Third Murder
#30 - Japan - Hirokazu Kore-eda's Shoplifters
Watched:
Japan - Takashi Miike's 13 Assassins
Japan - Takashi Miike's Audition
Japan - Kinji Fukasaku's Battle Royale
Japan - Kentarō Ōtani, Keiichi Satō's Black Butler
Japan - Takashi Miike's Blade of the Immortal
Korea - Lee Chang-dong's Burning
Japan - Sabu's Dangan Runner
Korea - Park Chan-wook's The Handmaiden
China - Zhang Yimou's Hero
Korea - Bong Joon-ho's The Host
Japan - Nobuhiko Obayashi's House
Korea - Kim Jee-woon's I Saw The Devil
Hong Kong - Andrew Lau, Alan Mak's Infernal Affairs
Hong Kong - Andrew Lau, Alan Mak's Infernal Affairs II
Japan - Toshiya Fujita's Lady Snowblood
Japan - Toshiya Fujita's Lady Snowblood: Love Song of Vengeance
Japan - Takashi Miike's Lesson of Evil
Korea - Park Chan-wook's Oldboy
Japan - Shinichiro Ueda's One Cut of the Dead
Japan - Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Pulse
Indonesia - Gareth Evans's The Raid
Indonesia - Gareth Evans's The Raid 2: Berandal
Japan - Hideo Nakata's Ring
Japan - Keishi Ōtomo's Rurouni Kenshin
Japan - Keishi Ōtomo's Rurouni Kenshin 2: Kyoto Inferno
Japan - Keishi Ōtomo's Rurouni Kenshin 3: The Legend Ends
Japan - Hideaki Anno, Shinji Higuchi's Shin Godzilla
Japan - Shūichi Okita's The Story of Yonosuke
Japan - Shinya Tsukamoto's Tetsuo: The Iron Man
Japan - Shinya Tsukamoto's Tetsuo II: Body Hammer
Korea - Yeon Sang-ho's Train to Busan
Korea - Jung Byung-gil's The Villainess
Japan - Shūichi Okita's The Woodsman and the Rain
Japan - Lee Sang-il's Unforgiven
 

D1tchd1gger

Guild Member
Avengers: Endgame
I think most of the plotholes can explained away by timey-wimey mumbo-jumbo, but the one thing that gets me is even though half the population of the world has gone that only takes the Earth's population back to the 60s! So why on earth have sports teams, who were established over half a century earlier when the population was half or more than that of the 60s (actually the Mets were established in the 60s themselves, but they replaced teams that go back to the late 19th century!), stopped playing? Baseball continued through both World Wars so it just feels very weird. The only thing I can think of to explain it is that, maybe, as Earth was the epicentre of the snap a lot more than half of the population were dusted!
 

Patient-X

Mad Scientist
Avengers: Endgame
I think most of the plotholes can explained away by timey-wimey mumbo-jumbo, but the one thing that gets me is even though half the population of the world has gone that only takes the Earth's population back to the 60s! So why on earth have sports teams, who were established over half a century earlier when the population was half or more than that of the 60s (actually the Mets were established in the 60s themselves, but they replaced teams that go back to the late 19th century!), stopped playing? Baseball continued through both World Wars so it just feels very weird. The only thing I can think of to explain it is that, maybe, as Earth was the epicentre of the snap a lot more than half of the population were dusted!
Maybe Thanos just wasn't a baseball fan 😋
 

farzam1999

Straw Hat Pirate
Monday, August 26th to Sunday, September 8th.
So I forgot to do last week lol, but there was only one film, so no biggie.

City Hunter
Guess what, I've watched this JC film completely, I KNOW RIGHT?! - lol, when I was younger I didn't finish this one because it hadn't caught my interest at the time. But with Eureka releasing this one, I had to pick it up and give it a try. I actually quite enjoyed it, it was something else. Sure, the comedy was over the top, but that was what I liked about it. It's one of those love or hate films, I think. Overall, normal story and characters, nothing to special there. 6.5/10.

Iron Monkey

I hadn't actually heard of this one just until Eureka released it. At first I wasn't wowed by the story, but by the time Yen's character was introduced, the story turned and caught me. I really liked the martial arts, and the main leads' perfomances also how the story tied in with the Fei-Hung character. 8/10.

Is there some kind of relation between this one and Li's OUATIC? - the theme song played 2-3 times, when Wong Fei-Hung was on screen.

Also great PQ on both releases from Eureka!
 

farzam1999

Straw Hat Pirate
Monday, September 9th to Sunday, September 16th.

Men in Black
So I was a bit unsure on whether or not I wanted to keep this trilogy as I remember the first one being a classic, but the last two to be meh. I was right about this one, great as always. I like how the film also blends in comedy with the story and such. Characters were all very good. 8/10. Also the PQ was amazing, up there with Ghostbusters, it's Sony, so I couldn't expect anything less.

Men in Black 2
I remember this one being the "worst" of the three. And I was right, however, it was not as bad as I remembered it being though. I still had fun watching it, and the story was okay. PQ also very good here. 6.5/10.

Men in Black 3
And lastly the final of the three films, was good, I would place it between the first and the second. The story was much better than the second, and I liked how Brolin played K. Overall a solid film, and a good trilogy. I'll be keeping them for sure. 7/10.
 

NormanicGrav

Yume no Shima Shinen Kōen
AUKN Staff

AD ASTRA is a 2019 science fiction film directed by James Gray and is the latest big space film that Hollywood has put out lately (the last one was First Man in the previous year). I went into this film with good levels of expectations primarily because of the recent buzz that the film had received at festivals and the concept in itself. For starters the visuals for this film are stunning, it's a mixture of special effects and practical effects and they look great on the big screen. It's worth noting that the film is available at IMAX so I recommend that option if you love that idea.

Now the story itself is an interesting one because I couldn't help compare it towards Apocalypse Now in both its structure and concept. Brad Pitt's character and the story for this film are very similar to Coppola's film but is set out in space and the way the story is going I honestly still liked it regardless. Basically what I am saying is that it doesn't feel original but part of it kinda does once you reach the last third half of the film. Brad Pitt I felt did a great job with his performance but it's a very different one to the other films he's done before. The music score is really good and the rest of the acting is simple but does the job.

Overall AD ASTRA was a surprising film to watch and while it is a slow burner and similar to Apocalypse Now with elements of 2001: A Space Odyssey (admittedly I have not seen 2001 but I can tell it shares inspiration from it) it is still worth checking out at the cinema. I honestly love the film's concept overall and the ending was quite satisfying in my books.

To sum up, give the film a watch especially in IMAX or if you prefer waiting for the 4K Ultra HD HDR experience you won't be disappointed I reckon.

4/5

Random note: One twitter user who watched the film at the festival summed it up as this year's "mother!". I agree with that statement since this is a pretty divisive film for audiences and I wouldn't be surprised if it flops at the box office.
 
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