In Memoriam: When DVDs become coasters

RadFemHedonist

Adventurer
Hilariously(!) at one point the Panasonic player popped up a system warning that I'd never seen before: "copyright violation". Is it a copyright violation to sell people awful quality discs that self-terminate after barely a decade? It certainly should be. But I imagine the damage just made the player mistakenly think it was a bootleg copy for a moment (it's not).

The same thing happened to me near the end of the main series of Yumeiro Patissiere (as in the second of the two discs somewhere between episode 46 and episode 50) on my Maiden Japan/Sentai Filmworks SD-BD! Hopefully, it doesn't mean that disc is damaged - I only just bought the set a few months ago :< Though that said I would buy a proper full HD BD of the series as I really enjoyed it, especially if they dubbed it for such a rerelease. Hopefully one day. But also would be nice if my SD-BD hasn't already started to malfunction... :( I wondered if the player was also malfunctioning in its modified multi-region playback capabilities but I guess there's no way to know unless similar things happen repeatedly with other discs (which thankfully has not been an issue so far).
 
I've had that copyright violation warning pop-up on my newer Panasonic players practically since the day I bought them, although rarely. Had a few crashes too. To me they behave more like BD-Roms with software players in a case rather than a dedicated Blu-ray player with hardware, either that, or the firmware is really crappy now.

I've kept all of my old DVDs, even when double-dipped to BD, but I do regret throwing out some VHS tapes. I never got the original Star Trek on DVD, and went straight to Blu-ray. and they really cut corners for fans of the original effects. The new effects may be all well and good, but they created new 5.1 mixes for those versions. But rather than find the original audio and remaster that for the versions with the original effects, which they did with a few season 1 episodes, for the rest of the episodes, they took the new 5.1 mixes, and downmixed them to 2.0 stereo for the old effects versions. In some episodes, there are audio effects for visuals that aren't on screen in the originals.
 

zrdb

School Idol
Burned dvds and blurays are another thing all together, if you used the cheapest blank discs you could find chances are very good that they'll fail in a short time. I have burned dvds and cds from 16 years ago that still play perfectly because I spent more money for good quality blank discs. For the most part commercial pressed dvds, blurays and cds will last a long time with proper care.
 

Geriatric hedgehog

Straw Hat Pirate
I'm increasingly unconvinced that any of the common storage types are good for optical discs in the long-term. The translucent plastic on amaray cases often 'sweats' a greasy film after a while, which I have to wipe off the play surface of discs sometimes. Matt black DVD cases don't seem to be affecting as much. Even steelbooks usually have a clear plastic inlay, so there's no getting away from it for blu-rays.

As for cardboard sleeves, it probably would scratch DVDs over time, but blu-rays should be less susceptible due to their scratch-resistant layer. That only applies to the play side of course; there's no extra protection on the label side. I think the main risk is just making sure that no off-cut fragments of cardboard get stuck to the play side, since that would likely play havoc with the lens.
What do you think about storing discs in those zip-up type of cases with multiple paper/cloth-type of sleeves instead? Is that material, whatever it actually is, kinder to the discs? Would be a palaver though and take away from actually having the cases & boxsets making a nice display on the shelves...
 
What do you think about storing discs in those zip-up type of cases with multiple paper/cloth-type of sleeves instead? Is that material, whatever it actually is, kinder to the discs? Would be a palaver though and take away from actually having the cases & boxsets making a nice display on the shelves...

That's where I keep my shonen anime, Naruto, One Piece, and Fairy Tail take up a lot of space. The cloth in those cases, especially the fat binders with removable pages, seriously scuff discs. They all play, and there are no significant scratches, but those discs have lost their mirror finish. They look like they've been through one of those buffing machines that are meant to fix scratched discs.
 

Geriatric hedgehog

Straw Hat Pirate
That's where I keep my shonen anime, Naruto, One Piece, and Fairy Tail take up a lot of space. The cloth in those cases, especially the fat binders with removable pages, seriously scuff discs. They all play, and there are no significant scratches, but those discs have lost their mirror finish. They look like they've been through one of those buffing machines that are meant to fix scratched discs.
Heheh like trying to find a fountain of youth, there's no winning here either...
 

Dai

Great Teacher
What do you think about storing discs in those zip-up type of cases with multiple paper/cloth-type of sleeves instead? Is that material, whatever it actually is, kinder to the discs? Would be a palaver though and take away from actually having the cases & boxsets making a nice display on the shelves...
I haven't really looked into those, so I'm not sure. I suspect the best solution might be a combination of a standard amaray case with a non-abrasive fabric inlay sitting between the disc's play side and the case to prevent any of that greasy film being transferred. I have no idea if pre-cut fabric disc protectors of that type exist though, and it would be a massive pain to slot them into every case.
 
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