I Want To Eat Your Pancreas simulwatch [RS] (21/11 - 28/11)

Neil.T

Idolm@ster
@WMD:

I think you've teased even more out of the film in your three viewings than I have with my two. Great post.

And I think you've hit the nail on the head with this:
For me the purpose of the twist is to rob them of their goodbye.

I Want to Eat Your Pancreas is a film about loss, and about how people process that loss or even attempt to prepare for it if afforded the opportunity.

The characters who knew of Sakura's illness had prepared themselves as best they could for her passing, only for an utterly tragic set of circumstances to suddenly rip everything apart.

For me, this "plot twist" is in fact the centrepiece of the film. Actually, I wouldn't be in the least bit surprised if it was the very idea that the author built the entire story around.

It's the fallout from Sakura's unexpected death that sets this film apart from other anime for me. It's raw and difficult to watch. The character growth that Haruki undergoes after she's gone was something that was supposed to happen within her lifetime and be there to witness, having been the person who set it in motion in the first place. The film's final payoff, of Haruki actively reaching out to Kyōko with a desire to become a friend to her, is something that was utterly unimaginable at the outset. It's a big moment in his life, and hopefully something of a belated turning point for him.

I take it that the Spanish dub of the film plays pretty well, then, WMD?
 

WMD

Railgun
For me, this "plot twist" is in fact the centrepiece of the film. Actually, I wouldn't be in the least bit surprised if it was the very idea that the author built the entire story around.
Indeed. To say its redundant is an oversimplification in my view. It's certainly shocking the first time you see it but on repeat viewing it becomes this tragic moment that the entire film gets restructured around. It also allows for the diary reading scene which is the grand centrepiece of the movie both visually and emotionally and story wise.

I take it that the Spanish dub of the film plays pretty well, then, WMD?
Yeah I really liked it. Its mostly played very naturalistically. Which obviously works very well for the story.
 

IdiomaticLynx

Student Council President
Interesting to see your views on the twist and ending, though something still feels off about it to me.

For me the purpose of the twist is to rob them of their goodbye. As much as he was starting to accept she would die the promise with the book meant it was something that couldnt happen yet, at least in his mind. I think that's why he didnt read the book, it would've been another step to accepting losing her and he wasn't ready for that.
I think you're spot on as for the reason why he didn't read the book. Robbing them of their goodbye makes sense, and in a way is even needed for the diary scene to work. Though, I believe there are plenty of other ways that could've been done.

The characters who knew of Sakura's illness had prepared themselves as best they could for her passing, only for an utterly tragic set of circumstances to suddenly rip everything apart.
The sad truth is that one can never prepare oneself for the passing of a loved one. That's one of the reasons why the twist just doesn't make sense to me. It's tragic enough as it would've been. Sakura being stabbed to death makes it worse in some ways, but it's still tragic, just in a different way.

Now I'm not trying to be overly nitpicky, it's just that I legitimately have a hard time understanding why? I can understand Sakura dying suddenly (to prevent a proper goodbye). I can also understand picking something unrelated to her illness, though I feel that 'she suddenly collapsed' would fit perfectly fine with some unnamed terminal illness. But why on earth let her end up being murdered?

The implications of this aren't really explored (luckily), but for me it only worked, because this was omitted. Maybe I'm wrong, since I've been fortunate enough to have never lost someone due to (criminal) violence, but I would expect the reaction of everyone to be different. Let's not forget that the murder trial will still have to take place. Often times you hear people not being able to properly grief and process the loss, until these things have taken place (which sadly tend to take years). Had any of the events been depicted, or what must've transpired afterwards (confirming the body is actually Sakura, family discussing whether an open casket can be done given injuries, etc...) I don't think it would've worked that well, which to me is already a sign something is off.

But the worst implication of her being murdered, which hurt my viewing experience the most has to do with the following:
It also allows for the diary reading scene which is the grand centrepiece of the movie both visually and emotionally and story wise.
The diary reading scene was really nice. In a way they brought her back to life through her own words. This is often done in fiction, and having a character prepare something for when they pass away is tricky to get right. Now this is a personal opinion, but the validity and authenticity of those words are strongly tied to how things play out IMO. Unlike anything else you write, these words are intended for after you pass away. As if you write them after you pass away even. Would you write them now just in case, and read those two years from now, it would likely no longer fit (as in, you wouldn't say those words in that way). In the same way, even if you would die tomorrow, someone must never read those words before you actually die. The magic of those words lies in the impossible gap it bridges.

Sakura being murdered does effectively invalidate those words. Basically it diverges at that point and we basically see a could've been version of Sakura. I'm well aware that this might be my peculiar way of looking at this part, but it's perhaps the key reason I dislike the twist. Interestingly enough it mostly bothered me after watching and not during, but that's probably because it completely omits depicting or detailing anything about the murder.

---
Anyway, I want to give credit to the title of the movie, which is absolutely brilliant. It's intriguing enough to pique your interest and manages to make complete sense at the end. I think most people have a sentence or two forever etched into their memory, because it's the last message they sent (or received) from someone who suddenly passed away. Often times it's a trivial or nonsensical sentence (if not just a word or two), but you'll never forget them. This really fits with topic of loss and makes it a perfect title for this movie.
 

WMD

Railgun
Interesting to see your views on the twist and ending, though something still feels off about it to me.


I think you're spot on as for the reason why he didn't read the book. Robbing them of their goodbye makes sense, and in a way is even needed for the diary scene to work. Though, I believe there are plenty of other ways that could've been done.


The sad truth is that one can never prepare oneself for the passing of a loved one. That's one of the reasons why the twist just doesn't make sense to me. It's tragic enough as it would've been. Sakura being stabbed to death makes it worse in some ways, but it's still tragic, just in a different way.

Now I'm not trying to be overly nitpicky, it's just that I legitimately have a hard time understanding why? I can understand Sakura dying suddenly (to prevent a proper goodbye). I can also understand picking something unrelated to her illness, though I feel that 'she suddenly collapsed' would fit perfectly fine with some unnamed terminal illness. But why on earth let her end up being murdered?

The implications of this aren't really explored (luckily), but for me it only worked, because this was omitted. Maybe I'm wrong, since I've been fortunate enough to have never lost someone due to (criminal) violence, but I would expect the reaction of everyone to be different. Let's not forget that the murder trial will still have to take place. Often times you hear people not being able to properly grief and process the loss, until these things have taken place (which sadly tend to take years). Had any of the events been depicted, or what must've transpired afterwards (confirming the body is actually Sakura, family discussing whether an open casket can be done given injuries, etc...) I don't think it would've worked that well, which to me is already a sign something is off.

But the worst implication of her being murdered, which hurt my viewing experience the most has to do with the following:

The diary reading scene was really nice. In a way they brought her back to life through her own words. This is often done in fiction, and having a character prepare something for when they pass away is tricky to get right. Now this is a personal opinion, but the validity and authenticity of those words are strongly tied to how things play out IMO. Unlike anything else you write, these words are intended for after you pass away. As if you write them after you pass away even. Would you write them now just in case, and read those two years from now, it would likely no longer fit (as in, you wouldn't say those words in that way). In the same way, even if you would die tomorrow, someone must never read those words before you actually die. The magic of those words lies in the impossible gap it bridges.

Sakura being murdered does effectively invalidate those words. Basically it diverges at that point and we basically see a could've been version of Sakura. I'm well aware that this might be my peculiar way of looking at this part, but it's perhaps the key reason I dislike the twist. Interestingly enough it mostly bothered me after watching and not during, but that's probably because it completely omits depicting or detailing anything about the murder.

---
Anyway, I want to give credit to the title of the movie, which is absolutely brilliant. It's intriguing enough to pique your interest and manages to make complete sense at the end. I think most people have a sentence or two forever etched into their memory, because it's the last message they sent (or received) from someone who suddenly passed away. Often times it's a trivial or nonsensical sentence (if not just a word or two), but you'll never forget them. This really fits with topic of loss and makes it a perfect title for this movie.
I think the reason the murder isnt delved into is simply because it has no bearing on Haruki. Hes the protagonist and the movie is almost entirely from his point of view. In fact on the rare instance it isn't, it tends to switch to Kyoko not Sakura. Is the film ever presented from Sakuras point of view? I'm not sure it is.

The method of death isnt really important. Only that it happens. By being a murder it's easier for them to foreshadow earlier and have it be nothing to do with her illness which is I think the point.

By the time my grandma died she had spent years with dementia getting worse. Every year I'd come home from my holiday in Spain thinking that'll be the last time I see her. When she died it was still very sad but it wasn't a shock to me. I was mentally ready to process it. That's the point here in the film. To be a shock to Haruki. To utterly destroy his world as it was beginning to form. To test him and see if he can take the next step and grow on his own or see if he will wilt away from the world.
 

Birdie Num Num

Great Teacher
I can't really go into this film as deep as others, I've only seen it the once but I really enjoyed it. (and from what others say, I should watch Your Lie in April next.)

I thought Haruki was without a personality because he thought he was a boring person or that's how he thought others saw him. He slowly opens up throughout the film, as change doesn't happen overnight, it takes time.

Regarding her death, it was foreshadowed in the early news reports on TV and also by herself saying you could die at any moment. I think that was the point, it was expected but it wasn't how it was supposed to happen.

There were flaws, like the ex-boyfriend situation, that could have been developed better but it was a really good film that I would recommend. 8/10
 

Lordhippos

Thousand Master
The diary reading scene was really nice. In a way they brought her back to life through her own words. This is often done in fiction, and having a character prepare something for when they pass away is tricky to get right

The diary scene in the film was indeed good :)

I am getting serious flashbacks to a certain episode of Violet Evergarden here based on what you said. I love the show but it's far too sad to make it onto my re-watch list anytime soon.

I can't really go into this film as deep as others, I've only seen it the once but I really enjoyed it. (and from what others say, I should watch Your Lie in April next.)

Absolutely yes! :cool:
 

Lordhippos

Thousand Master
Just a quick note to say thanks for everyone for watching along and commenting as always, I always like to see different points of view and some of the comments here especially help me to at least try and see some events of the film in a different light.

With Ergo Proxy starting soon, I will try and get another film in around the christmas/new year period, the list is shorter for choices now but none the less there are a lot there I haven't seen still.

Any suggestions for additional options please post them in the main RS thread (linked in the first post of this thread).
 

WMD

Railgun
Just a quick note to say thanks for everyone for watching along and commenting as always, I always like to see different points of view and some of the comments here especially help me to at least try and see some events of the film in a different light.

With Ergo Proxy starting soon, I will try and get another film in around the christmas/new year period, the list is shorter for choices now but none the less there are a lot there I haven't seen still.

Any suggestions for additional options please post them in the main RS thread (linked in the first post of this thread).
It's been a lot of fun and dont get to speak to many people irl about anime, at least not in this depth, so I always enjoy these simulwatches. I'm so ready for Ergo Proxy!
 

Geriatric hedgehog

Thousand Master
It's been a lot of fun and dont get to speak to many people irl about anime, at least not in this depth, so I always enjoy these simulwatches. I'm so ready for Ergo Proxy!
I second that, love this forum for that very reason and it's always great to have the gaps filled with collective opinions during simulwatches. Great points @WMD and they make sense in relation to taking away the chance for a final goodbye. While I agree the mode of the sudden death wasn't important, I'm still conflicted and in the same boat as @IdiomaticLynx in finding the choice a bit odd. One thing that came to mind later though was that the suddenness could in a way also be looked at as a mercy, rather than having to watch someone you love dearly crumble slowly in front of you with such a terrible quality of life and/or pain as to make one wonder what the point of going on is.
 
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