Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata announces new films for Summer 2013

GolGotha

Death Scythe
Re: The News Thread (for news that does not need a thread)

Studio Ghibli and its distributor TOHO officially announced Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Is Rising) and Kaguya-hime no Monogatari (The Tale of Princess Kaguya), the latest films from studio co-founders and directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, on Thursday. Both are scheduled to open throughout Japan next summer.

In February 2009, Miyazaki launched a two-part manga mini-series called "Kaze Tachinu" that focuses on Jirō Horikoshi, the designer of Japan's famed Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter plane of World War II. Author Tatsuo Hori also wrote a novel called Kaze Tachinu, and the film's tagline references both real-life figures and paraphrases Hori's book: "Show respect for Jiro Horikoshi and Tatsuo Hori. We must try to live." (Hori himself was reportedly quoting Paul Valéry's "Le cimetière marin" or "The Graveyard By The Sea" poem, which read, "Le vent se lève! . . . il faut tenter de vivre!" or "The wind is rising! . . . We must try to live!")

Frequent Miyazaki collaborator Joe Hisaishi is composing the music of the film. Miyazaki is not only directing the film, but he conceived the story and wrote the screenplay himself. This will be the first film from Miyazaki since Ponyo about five years ago.

The famous Japanese folktale Taketori Monogatari (The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter) centers on princess named Kaguya who was discovered as a baby inside the stalk of a glowing bamboo plant. Taketori Monogatari has inspired dozens of manga and anime stories, such as Reiko Shimizu's Kaguya Hime and Arina Tanemura's Sakura-Hime Kaden.

Takahata already revealed in 2009 that his next film will be based on the folktale. The tagline on the film's website reads, "A princess's crime and punishment."

Shinichiro Ikebe (Future Boy Conan, Akira Kurosawa's Kagemusha) is composing the film's soundtrack. Takahata conceived the story and co-wrote the screenplay with Riko Sakaguchi. This will be Takahata's first film since My Neighbors the Yamadas about 14 year ago.

TOHO had already registered the domains for the websites for these two films, but it opened the websites on Thursday.

Both films will open on the same day, but separately. The last time that Miyazaki and Takahata had films opening on the same day, or even in the same year, was a quarter of a century ago when Miyazaki's My Neighbor Totoro and Takahata's Grave of the Fireflies were shown back-to-back in Japan in 1988.
 
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duoinchains

Brigade Leader
Re: The News Thread (for news that does not need a thread)

GolGotha said:
Studio Ghibli and its distributor TOHO officially announced Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Is Rising) and Kaguya-hime no Monogatari (The Tale of Princess Kaguya), the latest films from studio co-founders and directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, on Thursday. Both are scheduled to open throughout Japan next summer.

Very interesting. I've always preferred Takahata's gritter, more realistic movies over Miyazaki's fantastical ones when it comes to the Ghibli oeuvre, but here the roles are sounding like they've swapped, with The Wind Is Rising being the gritty biog and Kaguya the fantasy. Will be looking forward to watching both.
 

chaos

The Boss
For the first time since the 1988, Studio Ghibli's cofounders Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata will be releasing anime films in the same season with today's confirmation of summer 2013 plans for <i><b>Kaze Tachinu</b></i> and <i><b>Kaguya-hime no Monogatari.</b></i>

Kaze Tachinu is based on Miyazaki's 2009 manga of the same name, which in turn is based on book by Tatsuo Hori which takes a look at the life of Jiro Horikoshi, the man who designed Japanese fighter planes during World War II. Joe Hisaishi will providing the music for the film.

The story of moon princess Kaguya-hime, discovered as a baby inside the stalk of a glowing bamboo plant has been hinted as Takahata's next project since 2009.




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VivisQueen

Adventurer
Re: The News Thread (for news that does not need a thread)

duoinchains said:
GolGotha said:
Studio Ghibli and its distributor TOHO officially announced Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Is Rising) and Kaguya-hime no Monogatari (The Tale of Princess Kaguya), the latest films from studio co-founders and directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, on Thursday. Both are scheduled to open throughout Japan next summer.

Very interesting. I've always preferred Takahata's gritter, more realistic movies over Miyazaki's fantastical ones when it comes to the Ghibli oeuvre, but here the roles are sounding like they've swapped, with The Wind Is Rising being the gritty biog and Kaguya the fantasy. Will be looking forward to watching both.

I am also more of a Takahata fan than a Miyazaki fan, but I would not go as far as to say that Takahata's works are grittier. Grave of the Fireflies is grittier than anything Ghibli has done. But when you think about the other three movies, Takahata has directed on his own for Ghibli (Only Yesterday, My Neighbours the Yamadas, Pom Poko), they tend more towards the wistful and romantic. Those three are certainly less gritty than Princess Mononoke, which is one of Miyazaki's best. Princess Kaguya sounds like something Takahata would do, but with his own homely style rather than the epic fantasy acid trip that is Miyazaki's works.

Needless to say, I am so looking forward to these. The Masters back in the saddle!
 

Joshawott

Monsieur Monster
AUKN Staff
Re: Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata announces new films for

To be honest, my favourite Ghibli films have been the ones not directed by Miyazaki or Takahata (Whisper of the Heart was directed by Yoshifumi Kondō - so tragic that he had to die so young. Then there was The Cat Returns, which was directed by Hiroyuki Morita).

Both Miyazaki and Takahata have their merits and are both amazing directors in their own rights though. Grave of the Fireflies is by far the most powerful film I have seen - but even the author's history and reasons for writing it are incredibly tragic in their own (In fact, I'd love to see a biographical piece on Akiyuki Nosaka). I'd say that I've enjoyed Miyazaki's works more than Takahata's though - I've always kind of felt that Miyazaki has a greater vision for his works.
 
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